aperturemurder:

I’ve watched this vine like 50 times now,

trans-parenting:

And for those of you who are more visual.  Here are some comic representations of dysphoria and/or pieces of it.

From top to bottom:
Becoming Me
Transgirl Next Door
Manic Pixie Girl
GQUTIE

  • *watches a movie*
  • *sees a dog*
  • me: if something happens to that dog I sWEAR TO GOD
elledreamlove:

Bohemian Wornest на We Heart It.

elledreamlove:

Bohemian Wornest на We Heart It.

gobeur:

p

enchantedsleeper:

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1886), John Singer Sargent

enchantedsleeper:

Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (1886), John Singer Sargent

micdotcom:

Powerful portraits of the Liberians who beat Ebola

To help humanize the overwhelming statistics, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer and senior staff photographer at Getty Images, John Moore, visited an Ebola treatment center of the organization, Doctors Without Borders in Paynesville, Liberia. At the treatment center, survivors spoke about the brothers, sisters, husbands and wives they lost due to the disease. They also spoke of recovery, stigmas they continue to face in their villages and renewed hope.

devilthrones:

"For one thing, there’s Dido’ fetishization by the two Ashford brothers. While one brother sees her simply as an exotic "other" whom he can bed without forming attachments — very different from the attitude toward white women of the same time period, whose virtue was unequivocal and untouchable — the other is downright violent in his conception of Dido, calling her "repulsive" but still expressing a desire to rape her. The scenes in which that older, more violent Ashford brother addresses Dido directly, giving voice to his unbridled racism and at one point assaulting her, are indisputably disturbing, not just because they represent a disgusting and brutal history but because I see remnants of those attitudes today in the way the world perceives the bodies of black and brown women: exotic, sexual, sensual, different objects. We see it in the way Miley Cyrus and almost any given white pop star (Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke, for example) use black women’s bodies as props in music videos: as something to be appropriated and used for one’s own pleasure and then cast off in pursuit of the next trend. In addition, the rape of black women still does not seem to carry much horror in 2014; it was most recently a punchline on Saturday Night Live, and last year Russell Simmons was forced to apologize for his highly offensive "Harriet Tubman Sex Tape." None of this is too different from the way the Ashford brothers perceive Dido’s body: as an exotic "other" not worthy of love or respect but merely of lust, and lust framed in a particularly problematic racism."

 Belle: A Lesson in the Timelessness of Racism and Misogyny Against Black Women by Olivia Cole 

wapiti3:

MACRO INSECTS on Flickr.

立山 L.S. Yin photos (Macro Insects)